Just 5 More Things

because things come in groups

337 notes

coolchicksfromhistory:

Leona Vicario (1789-1842)
Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)
A wealthy and connected young woman, Leona served as an organizer in Mexico’s independence movement.  She collected intelligence, conveyed messages, and provided financial support to the rebels.  Jailed twice by the royalists, Leona refused to give up the cause.  She and her husband Andrés Quintana Roo spent years on the run and Leona gave birth to their first child in a cave.
Eventually, the rebels succeeded in creating an independent Mexico.  Lenora and Andrés became leading figures of the new country.
Leona’s profile appears on a version of the $5 Mexican coin with the words “Bicentario de la Independencia” (“Bicentennial Anniversary of Independence”).

coolchicksfromhistory:

Leona Vicario (1789-1842)

Art by Tiny Tarakeet (tumblr)

A wealthy and connected young woman, Leona served as an organizer in Mexico’s independence movement.  She collected intelligence, conveyed messages, and provided financial support to the rebels.  Jailed twice by the royalists, Leona refused to give up the cause.  She and her husband Andrés Quintana Roo spent years on the run and Leona gave birth to their first child in a cave.

Eventually, the rebels succeeded in creating an independent Mexico.  Lenora and Andrés became leading figures of the new country.

Leona’s profile appears on a version of the $5 Mexican coin with the words “Bicentario de la Independencia” (“Bicentennial Anniversary of Independence”).

43,906 notes

Better Identification of Viking Corpses Reveals: Half of the Warriors Were Female | Tor.com

juliedillon:

bisexualpiratequeen:

"Researchers at the University of Western Australia decided to revamp the way they studied Viking remains. Previously, researchers had misidentified skeletons as male simply because they were buried with their swords and shields. (Female remains were identified by their oval brooches, and not much else.) By studying osteological signs of gender within the bones themselves, researchers discovered that approximately half of the remains were actually female warriors, given a proper burial with their weapons.”

Women have always fought. We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it.

(Bolding mine)

"We have always been there, ‘contributing to history’. Our own, modern sexism contributes to the erasure of it."

(via women-in-science)

63,033 notes

typette:

perchu:

underthesymmetree:

Fibonacci you crazy bastard….

As seen in the solar system (by no ridiculous coincidence), Earth orbits the Sun 8 times in the same period that Venus orbits the Sun 13 times! Drawing a line between Earth & Venus every week results in a spectacular FIVE side symmetry!!

Lets bring up those Fibonacci numbers again: 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34..

So if we imagine planets with Fibonacci orbits, do they create Fibonacci symmetries?!

You bet!! Depicted here is a:

  • 2 sided symmetry (5 orbits x 3 orbits)
  • 3 sided symmetry (8 orbits x 5 orbits)
  • sided symmetry (13 orbits x 8 orbits) - like Earth & Venus
  • sided symmetry (21 orbits x 13 orbits)

I wonder if relationships like this exist somewhere in the universe….

Read the Book    |    Follow    |    Hi-Res    -2-    -3-    -5-    -8-

i dofnt know what any of this means but these gifs are so raw im gonna rbelog it anyway

the fibonacci sequence is as close to a universe easter egg as we can possibly get. it’s a repeating pattern of numbers that you see fucking everywhere!

it appears in shit like this, from things like mathematic fractals, to the way fruits and plants grow, to the golden ratio that ALL of our proportions fit into, and a ton of other totally unrelated fucking things like the bending of light through water, how veins, rivers and lightning are connected in pattern shapes, and so on and so on

some people say it’s evidence of god, some people say it’s an artifact of us 3D beings travelling through higher dimensions, many agree it’s the truest essence of beauty and the connection between math, science and artwork…

its p. neat tho you gotta admit

(via electricalice)

Filed under fibonacci

1,451 notes

Interview with Maryam Mirzakhani, the brilliant Iranian mathematician who was the first woman to win the Fields Medal

Interviewer:
What advice would you give lay persons who would
like to know more about mathematics—what it is,
what its role in our society has been and so on?
What should they read? How should they proceed?
Dr. Mirzakhani:
This is a difficult question. I don’t think that everyone
should become a mathematician, but I do believe that
many students don’t give mathematics a real chance.
I did poorly in math for a couple of years in middle
school; I was just not interested in thinking about it.
I can see that without being excited mathematics can
look pointless and cold. The beauty of mathematics
only shows itself to more patient followers.

Filed under patient followers